How long does weed (cannabis) stay in your system?

Cannabis has a secret! It’s in your blood! Depending on what country you’re from, the last thing people would want is having cannabis in their blood. Having cannabis in your blood can have a lot of psychosocial implications such as being unable to get your driver’s license, being implicated for another crime, is accused of

Cannabis in your blood

Cannabis has a secret! It’s in your blood!

Depending on what country you’re from, the last thing people would want is having cannabis in their blood. Having cannabis in your blood can have a lot of psychosocial implications such as being unable to get your driver’s license, being implicated for another crime, is accused of some other crime, and for students – either getting suspended or expelled. And while there are health benefits to cannabis due to cannabidiol, the drug tests often look more at the THC content which is the one responsible for getting a person high.

So how long does weed (cannabis) stay in the system? We’re about to find out!

How long does cannabis stay in your blood?

There are a lot of factors that can cause cannabis to stay in your blood. Some factors include as to how heavy a user one is. If one only used it once, it would only take around 3 days before it would completely disappear. However, heavy users have reported cannabis being present in the body for more than 90 days which can be quite detrimental especially for jobs that require drug tests.

What makes cannabis stay in your blood?

The protein found in cannabis is known as THC which hides among the fat cells. While it hides in the fat cells, there is a production of thc-cooh (11-Nor-9-carboxy-THC) which then will begin breaking down the THC in your blood. This metabolite only appears however when your liver starts to process the THC.

How do people know when there is cannabis in your blood?

Cannabis can show through a variety of effects. And depending on the quality of the cannabis, it will also affect the duration as to how long it will take for the effects to appear. Some of these effects include:

Cognitive Impairment

This is often times coupled with altered sensory perception. Either increase or decrease of the alteration of your senses can cause your mind to be unable to process things.

Lack of Focus

This is another sub symptom due to altered sensory perception. The altered perception causes your mind to be unable to focus on one thing.

Altered Sensory Perception

Depth perception will be altered which can be dangerous while one is driving. It can lead to accidents and deaths which is why if you’re going to take Weed, always have someone who’s not hit with you.

Manic Episodes

Manic episodes can encompass a variety of effects such as hyperactivity, insomnia, heightened vigilance, increased levels of happiness to the point of drunken laughter and stupor.

Heightened vigilance to the point of paranoia and anxiety

If not careful, this can also be accompanied by auditory or visual hallucinations. And if the person has aggressive tendencies towards those hallucinations, it can develop into a far worse social situation such as actually having to restrain the person. However, there are some who are more of the crying type when it comes to anxiety. Best not take weed when suffering another mental disorder because it can lead to the amplification of those side effects.

Increased appetite

Altered Sensory perception is not only in terms of hearing, sight, smell, and taste. But it also affects how one processes the body’s internal workings such as food. And since THC attaches to the fat cells and is trying to burn it, your body will have increased appetite in an effort to replace the burned fat cells.

Other ways of testing if a person has cannabis in their blood is through the usual medical tests through either blood tests, urine tests and, hair tests. Often times, people can either buy these tests or government agencies perform these tests. These tests are there to make sure that they’re giving the privilege to the right person. Privilege can include driving, getting government ID’s, and perhaps the ability to procure certain medicines.

How do you remove the cannabis in your blood?

Sometimes, the best way to remove the cannabis in your blood is to let it run its course. Speeding up the detoxification can prove problematic. Sometimes, it’ll even have a stronger concentration when you undergo the drug test. However, there are some ways you can help the process along in detoxifying your body.

  • Drink a lot of water. This can lower the concentration of THC still present in your blood.
  • Don’t use masking agents. If you’re allergic to some of the ingredients, it’ll be problematic especially if you have an anaphylactic shock.
  • Don’t take in too much carbs. This forces your body to rely on burning the fat inside your body. It creates ketones which then will serve as a form of energy. This will also force the THC to burned out or to be flushed out of the system.

How do I know if someone is addicted to cannabis?

. The THC then creates that high and flying feeling, allowing the users to not feel their depression or certain things. However, it can also backfire and make one more focused on their problems. Anything in excess can be bad and weed is no exception. It was even classified as a DSM-V Mental Disorder known as Substance Abuse.

So how would you know?

1. History of Cannabis Abuse

Having a history of using cannabis (weed) prior can develop. People who have had addiction problems can possibly relapse into using cannabis irresponsibly.

2. Depression

Depression is a mental disorder that commonly is comorbid with substance abuse. Cannabis can be seen to those afflicted with depression as a means to cope with their dark thoughts.

3. Anxiety

Anxiety can be triggered by cannabis but also can be a long time effect on the person. The THC that remains in the body can cause hypervigilance which then will trigger anxiety and overthinking.

4. Loss of Control

The loss of control would be caused by their desire to keep on taking cannabis to forever keep their high.

And if they do, the best thing you can do is try to keep them away from it. And consult a psychiatrist should you feel that their attachment to weed is becoming an addiction.

Cannabis in your blood

Sources:

  • Moore, T. H., Zammit, S., Lingford-Hughes, A., Barnes, T. R., Jones, P. B., Burke, M., & Lewis, G. (2007). Cannabis use and risk of psychotic or affective mental health outcomes: a systematic review. The Lancet, 370(9584), 319-328.
  • Arseneault, L., Cannon, M., Poulton, R., Murray, R., Caspi, A., & Moffitt, T. E. (2002). Cannabis use in adolescence and risk for adult psychosis: longitudinal prospective study. Bmj, 325(7374), 1212-1213.
  • Patton, G. C., Coffey, C., Carlin, J. B., Degenhardt, L., Lynskey, M., & Hall, W. (2002). Cannabis use and mental health in young people: cohort study. Bmj, 325 (7374), 1195-1198.Patton, G. C., Coffey, C., Carlin, J. B., Degenhardt, L., Lynskey, M., & Hall, W. (2002). Cannabis use and mental health in young people: cohort study. Bmj, 325(7374), 1195-1198.Hasin, D. S., Fenton, M. C., Beseler, C., Park, J. Y., & Wall, M. M. (2012). Analyses related to the development of DSM-5 criteria for substance use related disorders: 2. Proposed DSM-5 criteria for alcohol, cannabis, cocaine and heroin disorders in 663 substance abuse patients. Drug and alcohol dependence, 122(1-2), 28-37.
  • Kendler, K. S., Jacobson, K. C., Prescott, C. A., & Neale, M. C. (2003). Specificity of genetic and environmental risk factors for use and abuse/dependence of cannabis, cocaine, hallucinogens, sedatives, stimulants, and opiates in male twins. American Journal of Psychiatry, 160(4), 687-695.

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